In the News

These images are protected under copyright laws and cannot be used without the express permission from the respective journal.

thumbnail 1

UCSD Researcher Wins the Prestigious 2018 Lennart Nilsson Award

Long-time UC San Diego researcher, Thomas Deerinck, has been awarded the 2018 Lennart Nilsson Award from the Lennart Nilsson Award Foundation in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the field of microscopy in biomedical research.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

New Focal Charge Compensation Mode for ZEISS Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopes Improves Image Quality

In collaboration with the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR) at the University of California San Diego, ZEISS (www.zeiss.com) released a new Focal Charge Compensation module for block face imaging with ZEISS GeminiSEM and 3View® from Gatan.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

New 3D Imaging Reveals How Human Cell Nucleus Organizes DNA and Chromatin of it’s Genome

In a new paper, published in the July 28, 2017 online issue of Science, a team of researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, describe development and application of new electron microscopic imaging tools and a selective stain for DNA to visualize the three-dimensional structure of chromatin.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Merry Microscopy and Happy New Technique!

Multi-color electron microscopy featured in NIH Director's Blog post commemorating the holiday season and the December tradition that sparked the idea.
Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Electron Kaleidoscope: New Technique Visualizes Multiple Objects in Many Colors

Ability to see beyond the grayscale promises future of revelations.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR Wins Prestigious NIH Scientific Visualization Competition

NCMIR team wins top prize in NIH “Beauty of Science” art competition for visualization related to glaucoma therapy.    

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR Aids UCSD Investigators in the Development of a Bioinspired Design for a New Space Exploration Device.

Using microCT, NCMIR researchers helped investigators from the laboratory of Joanna McKittrick at UCSD to model and analyze the 3D geometry of the sea urchin mouthpiece.  This highly accurate biological model was then used as a basis for the design and development of prototype claw device for robotically gathering soil samples.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR Images Smallest-yet Bacterial Genome Designed and Synthesized by Venter Institute

NCMIR scientists worked with J. Craig Venter and his team at the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) to characterize the genome segment sizes and ultrastructures of JCVI-syn3.0 cells.  JCVI-sny3.0 is a minimalist genome fully designed and synthesized by the team at JCVI that includes only the genes essential to support life.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR Investigator Receives Young Researcher Award for Work on Fragile X Syndrome

On March 17, 2016, Matthias Haberl, Ph.D., a postdoctoral researcher at NCMIR, received a Young Researcher Award from the Jerome Lejeune Foundation associated with his doctoral research in Fragile X syndrome.  Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability and a frequent cause of autism spectrum disorder.  Haberli and colleagues in the laboratory of Andreas Frick found changes in the brain wiring that provide a potential explanation for the underlying sensory symptoms.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

$3 million grant enables nucleome imaging research at NCMIR/CRBS and the Salk Institute

Under its new 4D Nucleome Program, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund has awarded three grants totaling more than $30 million over five years to multidisciplinary teams of researchers at University of California, San Diego.  One of the three initiatives awarded to UCSD— called Imaging Tools — involves Mark Ellisman, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Neurosciences and director of the Center for Research on Biological Systems at UC San Diego, together with project lead Clodagh O’Shea, PhD, at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. The two institutions will receive a total of $3 million over five years to create genetically encoded metal nanoparticles and novel paints that will act as molecular beacons to light up genes of interest within the maze of DNA, enabling their structures to be visualized.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR’s own Picture Wizard Tom Deerinck featured in the January issue of “The Scientist” magazine

NCMIR researcher Tom Deerinck was profiled by writer Jef Akst in the January 2015 issue of the magazine “The Scientist”.   Deerinck is a completely unique individual with a novel career history of creating high works of arts from his impeccable scientific studies. The magazine profile details how he came to work when he was 20 years old under the tutelage of distinguished professor Mark Ellisman at UCSD in 1978 as well as how his passion for the scientific process and imaging on state-of-the-art microscopes endures.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR researcher captures second place in the 11th annual Olympus BioScapes International Digital Imaging Competition

Winners of the annual Olympus BioScapes Competition were announced December 16, 2014, and NCMIR researcher Thomas Deerinck garnered second place for his triple labeled confocal fluorescence image of cerebellar Purkinje neurons in rodent brain. The competition, which is widely recognized as one of the preeminent photography competitions focusing on microscopic imaging in the life sciences, attracted over 2500 entries from 70 different countries throughout the world.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

UC San Diego and NCMIR Researcher Roger Tsien is awarded the first annual Golden Goose Award from Congress

PhD, Professor of Pharmacology at UC San Diego and Nobel laureate for Chemistry 2008, for work related to NCMIR at UC San Diego, received the Golden Goose Award in September 2012. This award “showcases researchers who pursue oddball topics that eventually lead to significant health and economic benefits, the awards were created by a coalition of science organizations (including AAAS, publisher of Science Insider) Read More > >
thumbnail 1

The Microscopy Society of America awards the Maser Award to NCMIR’s own Gina Sosinsky

At the 2012 Microscopy & Microanalysis meeting held in Phoenix this July, Gina Sosinsky, Assistant Director of NCMIR and a UCSD Professor-In-Residence in Neurosciences was awarded the Morton D. Maser Ward for Distinguished Service to the Microscopy Society of America. This major society award recognizes outstanding volunteer service to the Society. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR Commissioned to Provide Artwork for the New Medical Education and Telemedicine Center at UCSD

Researchers from the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR) have been charged with providing science-based artwork for the public areas of the new +100,000 square foot Medical Education and Telemedicine Center on the campus of the School of Medicine at UCSD. The new center will be a hub of learning that incorporates state-of-the-art design and technology to prepare medical students to become physicians and innovators of tomorrow. It will also be used for physicians to learn new skills utilizing the latest advances in medical and surgical technology, such as surgical robotics.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Two Top Biological Imaging Centers Offer Powerful Free Online Tool to Researchers, Educators, and Public

ASCB’s The Cell: An Image Library and NCMIR’s Cell Centered Database introduce new interface to spur health discoveries and science education The collaboration of two leading cell image resource centers now provides a more extensive and advanced facility for archiving, sharing, and analyzing microscope images in great detail. The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) and the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR) at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), have joined forces to provide a unified interface. This union extends ASCB’s The Cell: An Image Library website with new capabilities and an extensible software infrastructure. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Waitt Family Foundation Project Develops Whole Brain Catalog

At the year’s biggest international meeting of neuroscientists, researchers from the University of California, San Diego will unveil a tool that could revolutionize the way scientists and students explore and map the mysteries of the brain. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Shared by UC San Diego and NCMIR Researcher Roger Tsien

University of California, San Diego Professor Roger Tsien, Ph.D., will share the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Osamu Shimomura of the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole and Boston University School of Medicine, and Martin Chalfie of Columbia University in New York. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Former NCMIR Project Scientist Awarded Society for Histochemistry's Feulgen Prize

Dr. Ben Giepmans, former NCMIR project scientist, was awarded the Society for Histochemistry's Feulgen Prize for his outstanding contributions to the development and application of new advanced fluorescent proteins and biarsenical-tetracysteine probes for light and electron microscropy. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR Scientist Wins Title of Top Science Photographer of the Year in the World Photography Awards

CMIR scientist Thomas Deerinck captured first place in the inaugural Sony World Photography Awards in the Professional Science Photography category announced at a VIP gala ceremony at the Palais des Festivals in Cannes, France. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Ellisman Gives Featured Lecture on Emerging Technologies at Society for Neuroscience 2007

Innovative efforts underway at UCSD's School of Medicine to leverage telecommunications and information technologies for accelerating biomedical research were featured during a special lecture during the 2007 annual Society for Neuroscience conference. UCSD's track record of driving the development of digital age technologies for acquiring, visualizing, and communicating research information was highlighted in a special lecture delivered by Dr. Mark Ellisman, of the University of California, San Diego. being conducted all this week at San Diego's Convention Center. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR Researcher is Helping to Bridge Art and Science Through the Use of Dynamic Media

Ruth West, director of visual analytics and interactive technologies at NCMIR and a team of engineers, computer scientists, biologists, and artists have created interactive artwork for exploring new ways of representing nature in the era of metagenomics. Viewers can interact real-time with genetic sequences of marine microorganism on CalIT2's 100-million-pixel autosterographic display. The immersive visualization display is titled ATLAS in silico and is on display August 4-6 at UCSD's CalIT2 as part of the annual SIGGRAPH conference that features cutting-edge computer graphics and interactive technologies. Attendance at this year's conference is expected to attract 25,000 to San Diego. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

UCSD to Acquire Cutting-Edge Electron Microscope for Biomedical Research

UCSD's National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research (NCMIR) has been awarded a large grant to assist in the purchase of a new high energy electron microscope. Today's announcement by the National Center for Research Resources (NCRR), a part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), will afford NCMIR scientists an opportunity to explore new microscope technologies for advancing research benefiting biomedical research. UCSD's award is the only grant this year for an advanced electron microscope from NIH's High-End Instrumentation (HEI) program. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR scientist selected to judge the annual Nikon Small World Photomicrography Competition

Nikon Instruments Inc. has announced the judging panel for the 33rd International Small World Photomicrography Competition. The panel includes Thomas Deerinck, a Research Scientist at the National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research at UCSD. The other judges chosen by Nikon for this year’s competition include John Hart, an Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Professor at University of Colorado; Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer; Daniel Sieberg, Science & Technology correspondent for CBS News; and Nicole Dyer, Senior Editor at Popular Science. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR-Osaka Team Among Finalists in SC06's High Performance Computing Analytics Challenge<

NCMIR’s “Computational Oral and Speech Science on E-science Infrastructure” team will face off against other finalists in the SC06 High Performance Computing (HPC) Analytics Challenge, during a special session of the annual Super Computing Conference on November 14thSC06 is the premier international conference on high performance computing, networking and storage. SC06 will be held November 11-17, 2006, in Tampa, Florida. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR scientist wins first place in the 2006 Olympus BioScapes International Digital Imaging Competition

A strikingly colorful light microscopic image of mouse retina has earned first place for NCMIR scientist Thomas Deerinck in the 2006 Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition. The quadruple-fluorescence confocal image, taken as part of a study on neurofibromatosis, shows the highly complex organization of some of the different cell types present in the retina. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR, NBCR, CalIT2, and EVL demonstrate integrated environment for the development of multiscale, multimodal, multi-site science at SC06

Collaborators from the National Biomedical Computation Resource (NBCR), the California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (CalIT2), the University of Illinois' Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL), and NCMIR demonstrate how researchers at multiple locations can take advantage of advanced networks, software, and computational resources to extend the capabilities of bioscience instrumentation and informatics at the 2006 Super Computing Conference. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR-Osaka Team Among Finalists in SC06's High Performance Computing Analytics Challenge

Kazunori Nozaki and Susumu Date, of Osaka's Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, and colleagues from Japan and NCMIR will face off against other finalists in the SC06 High Performance Computing (HPC) Analytics Challenge, during a special session of the annual Super Computing (SC) Conference on November 14th. The premier international conference on high performance computing, networking and storage, SC06 will be held November 11-17, 2006, in Tampa, Florida. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Ellisman presents NCMIR research to Japanese Royals

At the invitation of Japan’s Emperor Akihito, Mark Ellisman presented an overview of NCMIR’s research on multi-scale imaging and multi-scale modeling of the nervous system. Ellisman presented a multimedia poster and summarized research advances made possible by an alliance of leading researchers in biology and brain research, as well as advanced computing technologies. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Bright future — Rapid advances in fluorescent tools promise to illuminate the details of protein expression, activity, and function

An interdisciplinary team of biological imaging experts from the University of California San Diego (National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research, Pharmacology Dept., Chemistry and Biochemistry Dept., and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute) recently contrasted the characteristic benefits and limitations of many new classes of fluorescent probes for studying proteins. Sharing the perspective that major advances in the life sciences are strongly tied to the ability to directly observe dynamic processes in living systems, and to localize the responsible molecular machinery in situ by electron microscopy, they published a review of relevant fluorescent imaging technologies in the 14-April-2006 issue of Science. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Studies of mouse models of human disease helped by NCMIR's large-scale imaging expertise

Scientists studying the nervous system have long struggled to understand how higher order structures, such as cellular networks, are assembled out of finer building blocks, such as dendritic and axonal architectures. Mapping the entire neural structure is the key to elucidating brain function. In a forthcoming issue of Neuroinformatics, a team of NCMIR researchers report on their progress towards this central goal by describing new procedures to study brain architecture and to characterize pathological changes in transgenic mice, spanning millimeter- to nanometer-sized structures. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

IBM's online series highlights NCMIR's Telescience technologies

When IBM seeks an authority on Grid-computing, they look to UCSD researchers. NCMIR's Abel Lin has authored a tutorial, "Building a Unified Grid" for IBM's authoritative online reference, DeveloperWorks. In this multi-part series, Lin details how Telescience's Grid-based system architecture for science, developed at NCMIR over the past 20 years, is helping to blaze trails for Grid-developers outside of the ivory tower. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR researcher wins second and eighth place in the Nikon International Small World Competition.

Nikon Corp has announced the winners of the 2005 Nikon International Small World Competition. Local NCMIR scientist Tom Deerinck garnered a second and an eighth place in the prestigious competition with his images of tissues stained with fluorescent quantum dots Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Science Features Collaborative Study Between NCMIR and Salk Institute

In a collaboration between computational neuroscientists and neuroanatomists, researchers have created a 3-D, nano-scale “anatomically correct” neuronal synapse that provides new insights into the way synapses work. Scientists combined biology, high-voltage electron microscopy, and computer modeling to view ectopic neurotransmission. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Science Highlights CCDB in "NetWatch"

The Cell Centered Database (CCDB) was featured in the journal Science's "NetWatch" column, which named the site as a novel way of making microscopic imaging data available to the science community. The article, which appeared in the March 25 issue, highlighted the CCDB's multidisciplinary appeal, as it benefits a broad range of scientists from "anatomists charting the nuances of neuron branching to modelers hoping to devise more realistic cell simulations." The CCDB is open to any researcher who wishes to contribute data. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR Featured in Bio-IT World

NCMIR’s “BioWall,” a newly designed 20-tile wall of high-resolution flat-panel displays that project massive, detailed 2D and 3D images of the brain, was featured in Bio-IT World this month. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Rat Cerebellum Image Wins Light Microscopy Award

NCMIR microscopist Thomas Deerinck's image of a rat cerebellum won fifth place in the Olympus Bioscapes International Digital Imaging Competition. The image, a photomicrograph of a section of rat cerebellum, was achieved using Quantum Dot technology and multiphoton microscopy. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR, BioWall Featured in The Scientist, San Diego Union-Tribune, and TechTarget

CMIR's newly constructed BioWall tiled display, a 20-tile wall of flat-panel displays that project massive, detailed 2D and 3D images of the brain, has been featured in a variety of publications in recent months. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Undergrads Explore NCMIR Cyberinfrastructure in Japan

As part of a National Science Foundation (NSF) project that prepares engineering students for the global workforce, two UCSD undergraduates are spending their summer enhancing NCMIR's cyberinfrastructure at Japan 's Osaka University. Stephen Geist and Ramsin Khoshabeh, under the tutelage of NCMIR's Mark Ellisman, Steven Peltier, and Tomas Molina, are exploring NCMIR's Telescience in collaboration with researchers from the Cybermedia Center at Osaka University. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR Represented at Microscopy and Microanalysis 2004

The annual Microscopy and Microanalysis conference featured NCMIR researchers demonstrating advances in imaging techniques. Dr. Diana L. Price's poster presentation, titled "Application of a Multi-Photon High-Resolution Large-Scale Montage Imaging Technique to Characterize Transgenic Mouse Models of Human Neurodisorders," won this year's M&M Traveling Poster Award. The study revealed neuropathology in the hippocampus and cerebellum of the Parkinsonian mouse brain, two areas often overlooked in Parkinson's disease research. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

U.S. and Korean Research Institutions Link Laboratories to Advance Microscopy and Information Technologies

Korean delegates from the Korean Basic Sciences Institute (KBSI) joined UCSD Chancellor Robert Dynes and NCMIR Director Mark Ellisman to sign a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) promoting international cooperation in information technology, advanced analytical imaging, and biomedical research. This July, that understanding will become accomplishment as NCMIR begins testing the boundaries of its Telescience; technologies on Korea's new 1.25 MeV ultra high-voltage electron microscope. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Telescience Enlisted in Fight Against SARS

Since February, more than 8000 cases of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and 600 deaths have been reported to the World Health Organization. When researchers from Taiwan, one of the hardest hit regions, began looking for ways to help combat the spread of the virus, they recognized the potential value of Telescience technologies developed by UCSD affiliates, and contacted NCMIR for help.

Read More > >
thumbnail 1

Telescience Recognized for Facilitating Biomedical Research on a Global Network

Telescience participants at Supercomputing 2003 demonstrated remote microscope manipulation, high bandwidth over the next generation Internet protocol (IPv6), and Web portal options for collaborative international research. Telescience won "Best Application" during the annual Bandwidth Challenge. Read More > >
thumbnail 1

NCMIR Exhibits Remote Control Microscopy in Europe

Scientists in Belgium operated NCMIR's electron microscope in San Diego via the Internet as part of an international forum to promote global research networking. At The Global IPv6 Service Launch Event in Brussels, Belgium this January, NCMIR researchers in San Diego invited Belgian scientists to manipulate remotely their high-performance electron microscope to examine a tissue sample from a mouse hippocampus cortex. Read More > >